Antietam Fly Anglers Casting Club featuring


FFF Certified Casting Instructor Robert Stouffer


Training Tips Archive

September 2010 Training Tip

LINE LAYOUT - IN-AIR MENDING AND CURVED CASTS

Mending line on the water is an important skill to acquire. In-air mending and curved casting starts your fly's travel in a way that makes on-water mending is less necessary. For all we are going through here in the US of A, just imagine going to work in the morning without the cloud of the burden of on-water mending hanging over you! Part of our practice is the foundation casting stroke as used in the Pick-up and Lay-down. We seek the elusive perfect line layout. Laser straight from your shoulder joint to the fly. As if someone had stretched the line and glued it to the surface. This cast is useful, particularly, when lake fishing or when you are streamer fishing in a river. You have immediate control of the fly without slack. It is, however, only one of the casts that you need in your toolbox. Wherever and whenever you fish you should wish to create a leader and line layout that helps you present the fly in a way that entices the fish to strike.

On many of our streams only a small step up, down or across the stream will change the tactical situation. Each such repositioning or lengthening or shortening of line may require a different line layout. The perfect line layout on a stream is not necessarily straight. If you are using dry flys or nymphs, the perfect line layout is the one that will allow the fly to drift through your target zone without the fly feeling and responding to the tug of the tippet - the "drag-free-drift". Or, when you sight a fish in open water and are using a streamer, it is the line layout that will show the fish the profile of the fly in his under-water window. These situations beg for a mended or curved layout.

Creating the controlled mended or curved layout in the fishing situation requires the caster to have made two conscious primary decisions. The first primary decision is to practice the mended and curved casts on the training ground; Reach mend right, Reach mend left, Pile cast (high front trajectory cast with reach-down to create the S curves in the line and leader), Parachute mend (reach up and back), Hump (or Bucket) cast (reach up reach down), Reach your tip right and back or left and back to place a sine wave that lands where you want it to land to defeat the drag of a rip of water, Underpowered curve (right and left) and Overpowered curve (right and left) and other casts. You will also want to learn these casts or mends in combination. Making the decision to train is easy.

The second primary decision is more challenging. After learning the casts, you must remember to picture the desired line layout on the water when fishing and execute the cast that creates that layout. Although your toolbox may be full, the tools have not been programmed to automatically jump to hand. You must consciously apply the use of these tools while on the stream.

Bob Stouffer, CCI

(See Jason Borger's Essentials of Fly Casting - a Modular approach for using the casts in combination)

February 2010 Training Tip

Education for Progress

I try not to recommend the spending of money to our club members. I am not good at marketing and, when making such recommendations to your friends it is hazardous. You may have to ride with them in a car for a long trip. There are, however, some expenditures that can yield benefits.

I recommend a library of at least two books about casting or casting mechanics. I do not care which books you choose - just understand that the reading of the books do have the potential to help you improve your casting and understand casting mechanics. I recommend that you purchase one book from two different authors so that you can understand that each author has a point of view which includes differences. It is good for your casting education. My personal library includes books by George Roberts, Jr., Lefty Kreh, Jason Borger, Joan Wulff, the late Mel Kreiger, Jawarowski and others. There is a pamphlet that you should purchase from the FFF called Essentials of Fly Casting by Bill Gammel. This pamphlet belongs in your casting club kit that you carry to each meeting.

The second recommendation is that you pay for a few hours class from a nationally respected FFF Master Casting Instructor. These hours are not expensive. Begin this education by attending a fly fishing show and pre-enrolling in a casting clinic offered by a known guru. These clinics usually cost about $70. No other sport offers this type of education for practitioners for this small amount of money. Remember - this person may be in the top 10 or 20 casting instructors in the world. Each year the FFF has a Conclave, generally held in the Western US, which lasts for nearly a week. I have attended two of these events and have received instruction from several of the best. Several other Antietam Fly Anglers have attended Conclave. You can take classes of all types and mix-in fishing or on-stream instruction. It is highly recommended.

For our part, the club has just printed the first several copies of "Caster's Progress", a Bob Abraham Casting Club publication to help you set and meet goals. This booklet will help you to chart your casting education whether at our club or attending classes elsewhere. More copies will be available in February.

Bob Stouffer, FFF CCI

December 2009 Training Tip


Roll Casting

A few years ago, I had significant problems executing a good roll cast. This past summer, on the Clark Fork just upstream from its confluence with the Bitteroot River, I was able to reach a seam in the water that I could only have dreamed about two years before with a long, high roll cast. Left-bank fishing a third of the way across the river, flat water in the center of the stream, and a bubble-line right up against a grassy cut-bank where the occasional fish rose to mayflies. A high bank behind me with a very irritatingly placed streamside tree denied any back-cast greater than forty feet. A good cast to the bubble-line yields several feet of drag-free drift before the line bows downstream and rips the fly away from the run. I have stood in that spot and cast until my arm got floppy, never reaching the fish. This past year, with the exact same rod-line-leader combination, I was able to drift the fly over the trout for the last hour of the evening. This was accomplished by anchoring the fly upstream of the target line, making a dynamic D loop and slowly casting and hauling to a high stop. It is a wonderful place and I hope to go there again soon.

The movements of your shoulder, arm, hand and body in the roll-cast are the same as the movements in a front-cast of a false cast or pick-up-and-lay-down. Roll casting is a fundamental skill taught either as the first skill (before the back-cast) or the second skill (after the back-cast). The cast is taught as a simple movement, but it has enough depth and nuance to sustain practice and improvement over a lifetime of casting. It is a cast that bridges casting styles and rod types. It can be practiced on grass as well as water. You can haul on the roll cast and you should learn to do so. You do not need a special rod for roll casting. You can use a very long two-handed rod, a switch rod, or a full-flex, progressive-flex or tip-flex single-handed rod. Indeed, you must be able to roll cast with all of your equipment because roll-casting is a necessity in all fishing situations. For a mental exercise, try to think of a fishing situation where you would not require, at some time or another, the roll cast. A fat book with umpteen visuals could be prepared about this one aspect of casting. A short list of suggestions follow. You only have to pay attention to the VERY IMPORTANT parts of this training tip.

Pace of the cast: THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT - Begin VERY SLOWLY. Make yourself practice casting too slowly for the first two-thirds of the stroke. Encourage your students or friends to try to cast so slowly that the cast will fail. You may find that beginning "too slowly" may result in a long roll-cast. Do not use hand-speed to get the line moving, just cast the rod in a way that you can feel the rod tip slowly pulling on the line. Start slowly with a long stroke and with a constant acceleration. "Good. Now this time begin more slowly."

Straight Line Casting Stroke: THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT - from a thumbnail position beginning at the same height of your temple, move your thumbnail in a straight line path. Try the horizontal path.

Length of the Casting Stroke: THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT - make a very long casting stroke.

Stop angle: THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT - stop the rod firmly after wrist rotation at a high rod angle and maintain the high rod angle.

Wrist rotation: THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT and, perhaps, the MOST IMPORTANT - begin the forward casting stroke in the Wrist Straight position and hold that wrist position until the very end of the casting stroke. When you get to the very last inch of the stroke, rotate the butt of the rod like you were trying to break it off just above the grip. Try the reach-cast from your high angle stop.

Bob' Training Tip for October 2009

Guest Writer (Instructor) Francois P. Levage (APAGI) used without his permission. Unedited except for obvious misspellings or usage (sic).

Learn to cast S l o w l y

Mr. Robert.

Thank you for the time you spent with me at the Federation Conclave in the State of Colorado this year. I hope that you benefited from my instruction. I read with great interest your tome on slow casting presented in the Antietam Fly Angler's posting, and noticed with equivocation the clenched teeth statement regarding Alastair Gowans, and also his accent. I certainly hope that this generalization is not used in the conduct your program. Nevertheless, let me continue our session with a word regarding apparel. I noticed that anglers in the United States, in general, dress for sport in an entirely different manner from their normal pursuits. Not one cravatte in the bung (sic). Not one American Cowboy chapeau in the bung (sic). Certainly there must be one American Cowboy in Colorado! Mostly the little casquette de baseball with prominent advertisement. These little casquettes offer very little protection against sunsburn or rain. Short pantalon and short shirt sleeves lengths, and the colorful gator shoes with holes and without bonneterie granted the entire week a comical window-dressing.

On the Continent, we attend to our head and face with sunsburn sceening and a hat with a small curtain on the back which covers the neck and ears. Also, it is important to note, that suns spectacles are very common here and offer great protection from harmful suns UV focalize. These three things are important to health and their use must be advanced by everyone involved in the sport. The chapeau de solier is most important. Also, please implore them the use suns screening tonique on the tops of the hands. Also, encourage the wearing of the long sleeve length chemise and suns screening tonique, even under the chemise. Mon Dieu, please consider the condition of your students and friends after a weekend in the suns. I understand that it is against the military law of your army to suffer en flammes de solier. Certainly you would not dare to send a client back to the family in such a state while still collecting your fees. Such education. If there is one thing from France that I can send you without spoiling in the mail, this is yours to enjoy.

Please practice for next time.
Fondly
Francois P. Levage

I hope that there is something in here from Francois that you can use. It was an interesting letter, even if I did not understand all of it.



Bob' Training Tip for September 2009


Learn to cast S l o w l y

I am proud to say that Alastair Gowans is an acquaintance of mine. Whether or not I am an acquaintance of his remains to be seen. If you can believe this, his instructor's title is Alaistair Gowans, BSc, CEng, AAPGAI and FFF Master and FFF Master Two Handed Casting Instructor. He is one of the nicest people on the planet. To say that he is a great caster is an understatement. Alaistair (Ally) makes an agreement with his line as to what is about to happen and the agreement is fulfilled. The line lays-out on the water smoothly and gently in the location and shape desired. I have witnessed him plucking burning objects from the mouth of Pete Greenan at fifty feet without damaging the object, tippet or Pete Greenan. His first three words to me were "Learn to track the rod" delivered through clenched teeth in his Scottish Brogue. He and his European counterparts value the slow gravity-defying loop because of its ability to deliver the fly gently on calm waters. Curiously, our state-side FFF instructors also place high value on the slow smooth loop even if they are Salt-water experts.

Applying a minimum of power on the smoothly tracked stroke to achieve a specific distance for a specific presentation is a rational goal. It is conservative of your energy. Distance casting gurus', such as our friend George Roberts, founds his entire Distance and Power videos on the slow, smoothly tracked loop. It is a corner-stone in your foundation casting stroke.

I think that Alaistair would agree with me that a worthwhile beginning and ending of your practice session would be to Track the Rod, Move your Thumbnail in a Straight-Line Path and Accelerate along the Hand-Target Line to a Stop with as little emphasis on the power as possible.
1 Track the Rod - make the rod move in a single casting plane without deviation.
2. Move you Thumbnail in a Straight Line Path - a straight line path is as if you were to aim a laser beam at a target and keep your thumbnail in the beam for the entire stroke.
3. Accelerate - start at zero miles per hour and increase the speed to about three miles per hour during the stroke.
4. Stop - stop the rod dead. Do not slow the rod to a stop. Stop the rod dead when it reaches its maximum (in this case, three miles per hour) rate.
5. More about the stop - Stop it dead as if your were hitting your knuckles on a thin cushion mounted to a plywood backing, not as if you were to hit your knuckles on the plywood backing. The purpose of the stop is to allow the rod to un-load. You do not have to force it to unload if you simply stop the rod.

Keep your hand relaxed during the entire stoke. A tense set of muscles, particularly the forearm and hand muscles, do not help you track the rod. A relaxed set of muscles helps you enjoy casting for longer periods and removes many of the extra waves that often follow the loop.

Bob Stouffer, CCI
It is a great educational goal for your casting progress. n outcome is occur, and it does line does what hef you were to cast a fly line on the moon, it would go a lot farther than here on the planet. The moon has virtually no atmosphere and one-sixth of the gravity as Earth. Unfortunately, the loop shape would be the same as here on good-old earth and the line and leader would "kick" wildly. That is physics. What kind of line-leader combination would you choose for the moon? How about here on the planet for a bass-bug? How about for a spring creek? There are LOTS of lines to choose from and LOTS of leader-tippet formulae. What makes one combination perfect for one thing and really sucky for another? That is physics.

Think of the fireman plying his trade on a four-story building fire while standing on a step-ladder. The fire hydrant has a very large diameter connection, from which a great volume flows under pressure. Let us choose 6" diameter for a starter. Lots of volume and it shoots about 20 feet. Since that will not get the water to the fire, we will connect to the hydrant with the 6" and then a series of hoses of diminishing diameters - 4", 3", 2" and, finally, 1 ½" diameter. We have forced the volume into smaller sized hoses, increasing the speed of the water at the nozzle. Fire is extinguished.

Now that the fire is out, lay the hose out from the hydrant and look at it. It looks like the taper of a fly-line or of a hand-tied leader. You provide the pressure to a fly line with your muscles and the rod-tip. The taper of line and leader receive the pressure from the thicker part (belly) of the line. The pressure increases as the line diminishes in diameter and is converted to increased speed (just like the hose). As the line tapers, the speed increases . As the linespeed increases, the air resistance (thankfully and unlike the moon) becomes an overwhelming force which controls the presentation of the fly by gradually slowing it down. Indeed, as the line gets faster and thinner, the air resistance on its surface is more of a factor. You need speed for accuracy or distance and air resistance to control the presentation. Short front line tapers and short tapered leaders combine to deliver the fly with authority (bass-bugging or weighted streamer). This is great for windy conditions because the line stays airborne a shorter period of time. If the leader "kicks" one way or the other, and it is not your hand motion causing it, you need to add more tippet to balance the system. If it does not turn-over, cut the tippet shorter so that the air resistance does not become too great a factor. Long front line tapers and long leaders are preferred for dry-fly fishing because the longer taper and tippet combine to present the small fly delicately.

Three things - there is nothing wrong with a double tapered line - there is nothing wrong with a weight forward line - there is nothing wrong with a shooting head. They do, however, all transfer momentum differently. If you understand the importance of air resistance, you can improve the performance of each to take advantage of your wonderful and improving casting technique.


Bob' Training Tip for March 2009


Physics of Line and Leader

If you were to cast a fly line on the moon, it would go a lot farther than here on the planet. The moon has virtually no atmosphere and one-sixth of the gravity as Earth. Unfortunately, the loop shape would be the same as here on good-old earth and the line and leader would "kick" wildly. That is physics. What kind of line-leader combination would you choose for the moon? How about here on the planet for a bass-bug? How about for a spring creek? There are LOTS of lines to choose from and LOTS of leader-tippet formulae. What makes one combination perfect for one thing and really sucky for another? That is physics.

Think of the fireman plying his trade on a four-story building fire while standing on a step-ladder. The fire hydrant has a very large diameter connection, from which a great volume flows under pressure. Let us choose 6" diameter for a starter. Lots of volume and it shoots about 20 feet. Since that will not get the water to the fire, we will connect to the hydrant with the 6" and then a series of hoses of diminishing diameters - 4", 3", 2" and, finally, 1 1/2" diameter. We have forced the volume into smaller sized hoses, increasing the speed of the water at the nozzle. Fire is extinguished.

Now that the fire is out, lay the hose out from the hydrant and look at it. It looks like the taper of a fly-line or of a hand-tied leader. You provide the pressure to a fly line with your muscles and the rod-tip. The taper of line and leader receive the pressure from the thicker part (belly) of the line. The pressure increases as the line diminishes in diameter and is converted to increased speed (just like the hose). As the line tapers, the speed increases . As the linespeed increases, the air resistance (thankfully and unlike the moon) becomes an overwhelming force which controls the presentation of the fly by gradually slowing it down. Indeed, as the line gets faster and thinner, the air resistance on its surface is more of a factor. You need speed for accuracy or distance and air resistance to control the presentation. Short front line tapers and short tapered leaders combine to deliver the fly with authority (bass-bugging or weighted streamer). This is great for windy conditions because the line stays airborne a shorter period of time. If the leader "kicks" one way or the other, and it is not your hand motion causing it, you need to add more tippet to balance the system. If it does not turn-over, cut the tippet shorter so that the air resistance does not become too great a factor. Long front line tapers and long leaders are preferred for dry-fly fishing because the longer taper and tippet combine to present the small fly delicately.
Three things - there is nothing wrong with a double tapered line - there is nothing wrong with a weight forward line - there is nothing wrong with a shooting head. They do, however, all transfer momentum differently. If you understand the importance of air resistance, you can improve the performance of each to take advantage of your wonderful and improving casting technique.


Bob' Training Tip for January 2009

Joys of Winter
You sit by the fireside, eggnog in hand, reviewing last years fishing triumphs and pleasures. Perhaps one of the triumphs that you review is the learning of the haul. The haul smoothed some of the bothersome waves that follow your loop, the loop was tighter, the cast was longer and the layout straighter. A canoe glides past carrying a Pomeranian with a little plaid jacket propelled by a man and woman outfitted by Abercrombie and Fitch. Beautiful fly casting, says one, and the Pomeranian agrees. It is the haul, you say. Your popper lands near a rock and the water explodes as the twenty-inch smallmouth shoots skyward in a gleaming, quivering leap. This remembrance a pleasure and triumph.

Certainly, the haul is a great assistant. Not only does the increased line speed and improved loop propel the wind-resistant fly farther, the haul also spreads the work to both arms and lessens the tiring effect of the thousand or so casts that you sometimes make in a day. The haul may be essential in wind conditions to minimize the amount of time that the line is in the air. The haul also makes you look and feel more balanced if accomplished correctly hauling on-line with the rod guides in a 180 degree relationship to the line travel.

The haul, however, can be a masquerade. It can hide deficiencies in your foundation casting stroke. My father was fond of saving energy in the 1950,s and 1960,s and walked behind us turning off lights and checking our bath-water depth. Our 54 Plymouth Savoy had three speeds on the column shifter. It bothered me as a child of 10 years when he skipped second gear and went directly from first to third "saves gas", he said. You could hear the engine labor slightly and you could hear some valve noise. This skipping of what I considered to be an important step in the stick-shift driving process is a metaphor for using the haul prior to making essential improvements in the foundation casting stroke. If you want to get the maximum line speed and distance benefit from the haul, learn first to make a clean and efficient thirty-five to fifty foot cast without a haul and without shooting line. Then practice shooting line. Learn to make a good-loop backcast while carrying the entire head of the line outside the rod-tip (40 to 45 feet of line [not including the leader] varies with the manufacturer,s taper). With a good backcast (the backcast is the key) you can learn to shoot thirty or forty feet of line on the front cast without hauling. Start short and add a foot or two whenever your loops look good and the cast lays-out straight with a straight leader. The learning process is incremental.

While you are having your eggnog in comfort, consider your incremental fundamental casting stroke improvements as pleasurable and triumphant.


Bob's March 2008 Training Tip

When practicing casting, wear a hat, wear sun-glasses or other eye protection. Begin by stretching and making short casts. Practice for fifteen minutes per day and concentrate on one skill at a time. Practice making 30 to 40 foot casts with a tight loop that does not have the energy to straighten and does not reach the target. Use a small ball of yarn (about the size of a dime or less) as a practice fly. Whatever the skill that you are practicing, cast to a target. Evaluate each of your casts and change your mechanics to produce a different result. Remember; one definition of "insanity" is to repeat the same thing over and over and over again, expecting a different result."

Bob's April 2008 Training Tip

I recently asked a very very good fly tyer how long it takes for a person with no formal training to learn to tie a Catskill fly. He said that after four hours of instruction, practicing a couple flies a day for a week and then a full dozen flies in one sitting, a person should be able to tie a fishable fly. It would take years of practice to be able to produce a Catskill fly worthy to place on a fly plate.

Casting is not different than any other physical endeavor. It takes training for the motor skills to produce a good loop on command. It is not a skill that we are born with. Train prior to going fishing. Learn to load the rod by accelerating from zero miles per hour to 2 or 3 miles per hour and stop the rod cold at an attitude of approximately 90 degrees from your target in both the backcast and front-cast. Slow casting like this yields the most lasting results.

Now, back to the Catskill fly. There is a parallel. It takes four hours of instruction and practice to learn a skill (such as casting a 24 inch loop at 30 feet). If you wait a week without practice after the instruction, you will probably not be able to produce the success that you had in training. Fifteen or twenty minutes per day of casting practice, including evaluation of the cast, for thirty days will help you cement a movement that is repeatable. A good fly line used to last me three or four years. Now it is shot in six months without using it for fishing. This is your goal: render useless a great fly-tying vice through use and render useless a practice line in the next year.


Bob's May 2008 Training Tip

Next Casting and Practice Tip
This is not about PERFECTION, but it is about IMPROVEMENT. So some self evaluation. Rather than continuing to cast until the leader and line forms a basketball-sized tangle, stop and relax after each cast and look at the shape of the line on the ground. If it is a straight line pick-up and laydown cast, is the line straight? Did the leader straighten fully? Is your practice fly near your target? The six-step method of teaching is also the six-step method of self-evaluation (See Bruce Richard's Loop article, 1999).

Step 1 What did the Line do - Lets say that it made a very large loop.
Step 2 What did the Rod do - The rod tip traveled in a convex path.
Step 3 What did the Body do - Convex rod tip paths are created by the hand and arm traveling in a convex path.
Step 4 What should your Body do - To make a smaller, aerodynamic loop, the hand and arm must travel in a straight line path.
Step 5 What should your Rod do - If your rod is accelerated to a stop, the rod tip path will describe a straight line path as well.
Step 6 What will your Line do - A line propelled by the straight line path of the rod tip will form a smaller and more aerodynamic loop.

Use this method of self-evaluation to improve your casting.
Remember - if you throw a loop perfectly aligned on the eye-target line, you will not be able to see the shape of the loop. Practice casting off-plane (say a 45 degree horizontal plane) occasionally to see the loop. Use the buddy system or a cam-corder to evaluate vertical casting plane loops.


Bob's June 2008 Training Tip

Practice Roll Casting on Grass
Yes, you can roll-cast on grass. First, cut the grass. If you do not have a great place to practice casting in you yard, cut the neighbor's grass. The planton seed stalks and dente de lion shoots are detrimental to practice because they grab your leader and line in a way to counter the smooth turn-over you are looking for. Secondly, remember that the roll-cast stroke is just the front half of an aerialized casting cycle. Thirdly, the anchor must be placed properly. You need some line in front of and just to the casting hand side of you. I check my anchor by reaching with my rod-tip to touch the yarn fly. If I have to stretch slightly to the front of and to the side (on my rod-hand side) it is a good "stick" or "anchor placement". Fourth, remember where your hand-arm-rod angle would be if you were at the pause after the back-cast. Start the cast by getting into that position or make it a longer stroke as if you had "drifted" to the rear. For really long roll casts, REALLY reach back. Fifth, remember to increase the Arc proportionally as the length of line outside of the rod tip increases. Lay the rod angle back farther for a long roll cast. Sixth and finally, the stroke (no, not the medical terminology) - the Casting Stroke; start slowly and accelerate on a STRAIGHT LINE HAND PATH (move your thumbnail in a straight line) - (here is the kicker) and delay the rotational acceleration (accelerating through the Arc) until very late in the cast. The acceleration, both translational and rotational, crest in the very last several inches of the stroke.

Here is another practice tip to remember about roll casting: during the stroke, move the rod tip so that it traces a line directly above the line layout (an extension of the 180 degree principal). If your anchor is in front and just slightly to the side, the cast should be made on a vertical plane. If the anchor and layout are farther off to the side, the cast should be made horizontally. Tilt your hand-arm to mirror the line layout. This tip will pay dividends unheard of in the financial sector.


Bob' Training Tip for October 2008

Tracking
Tracking (aligning the rod plane, casting plane, back-cast target and front-cast target perfectly, so that the line goes straight and lays-out straight) Tracking the rod is a difficult skill to master. For side-arm casters, it is more difficult. The rod-tip path must be a perfectly straight line from beginning to end of the back and front cast so that the loop and following line travel the same path.

Many side-armed casters also "Drift" to create a longer stroke or wider arc for the next, generally longer, cast. Side-armed casting makes it more difficult because drift movements (intentional or otherwise) and follow through movements will pull the next rod-tip path off line. This, for an off-vertical cast, causes the line layout to often be "curved" on the subsequent cast. It causes the loop to swing in a figure of eight and affects accuracy.

First, learn to Stop and Stay
If you practice off-vertical (side-armed) casting, practice moving your rod hand on a straight line to a stop and keep the rod hand perfectly still. Watch your back-cast stop and keep the rod tip perfectly still with no movement after the stop. Stay still until the loop unrolls and you begin your forward cast. You can do this if you watch and concentrate on keeping the tip still. See if this practice is helping you get a straight line layout.

Then, learn to Stab
Now, understand what it will take to drift the rod and keep it perfectly in line. For the off-vertical caster, a drifting move is a "stabbing" move. Moreover, it is a "stabbing move" in the direction (on the axis of) your rod is pointed. Think about stabbing with a sword, except very slowly, while the line unrolls.

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